How Does Weather Affect Your Writing?

Weather can be a major factor in a story or poem. If you look out your window, you can be inspired. I live in Western Massachusetts, where they say “If you don’t like the weather, just wait.” It changes rapidly from beautiful sunny days, to mist, to rain, to snow, sometimes in the same day. I usually spend some time in Costa Rica in the winter, where I am now, where there are many ecosystems in a little country, including temperate, dry, tropical, sub-tropical. There is a dry and a rainy season, and the winds, called Papagayo, blow across the Cordillera del Talamanca.

Think of all the climates in novels. British author J. Ballard in The Wind from Nowhere, creates a dystopia in which hurricane-force winds dominate the climate. Mother of Storms by John Barnes describes a catastrophic weather change caused by a nuclear explosion. Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake, where the world is divided into gated communities and pleeblands where the working class lives in unsafe, populous and polluted communities. Weather in a book an be a plot motivator or scene setter.

And where would we be without nature poems. Think of William Wordsworth, “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,”

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Photo by Andre Furtado on Pexels.com

March 2021

March has brought unusually beautiful weather Costa Rica, with sunny skies, and wind blowing cooling breezes through the mountains.   I hear the Northeast has been engaged in “glorious spring” with temperatures largely in the 60’s Fahrenheit.

Storms really are unpredictable. They can add an interesting plot twist to a novel, or line to a poem. And they can move from dangerous, unpredictable weather, to rainbows and sunshine. How does this affect your plot?

In my latest book of poetry, Touch My Head Softly, the story involves my lover who had dementia. While I see an “unrelenting grey,” my partner, in his altered state, sees “white lilies surviving frost.”

Check out my book at:

https://www.finishinglinepress.com/product/touch-my-head-softly-by-eileen-kennedy/

Or view it on Goodreads at:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/3609820860https://www.finishinglinepress.com/product/touch-my-head-softly-by-eileen-kennedy/

Esterillos Este Sunset. Photo by Eileen P. Kennedy

Today, let us swim wildly, joyously in gratitude. – Rumi

I’m grateful today for many things,

A lake in Western Massachusetts

I’ve canoed and hiked in beautiful places all over the Northeast this fall. The nature sustains me. Writing sustains me. I have a new book, Touch My Head Softly, which will be out from Finishing Line Press in early 2021.

https://www.finishinglinepress.com/product/touch-my-head-softly-by-eileen-kennedy/

My family, although, I haven’t seen them in some time, are all well.

I hope all of you have wonderful things to be thankful for, even if you don’t celebrate this American holiday.

I’ll continue blogging announcements on Tuesdays and my blogposts will post on Thursdays.

Happy Thanksgiving.

Salt

I grew up on a bay with salt.

I always had a salty taste on my lips

and as soon as I approached home,

I smelled it in the air.

The salt dried out the skin and

you needed extra moisturizer  after swimming.

We didn’t have salt in the sugar bowl

but we had rice in the salt shaker

to keep the salt flowing in the humidity.

 

Anyone else grow up on a bay?

photo of seaside during daytime

Photo by Dimitry Anikin on Pexels.com

Blogging in the Time of Corona

Now that I have infinite time to write and blog, I find myself resisting the urge and cooking and wiping things down as we’re told to do a hundred times a day.  How do others feel about blogging?adult blur books close up
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com