Book Launch by Tzivia Gover 6:30 pm January 11 at the Forbes Library, Northampton, MA on Dreams and Writing

BOOK LAUNCH EVENT AND CELEBRATION

Jan. 11, 6:30 -7:45, Forbes Library, Northampton, MA

Tap into Your Midnight Mind with Dreams and Writing

Learn how to use the science and psychology of sleep, dreams, and mindfulness to supercharge your creativity, and wake up to your best life with Tzivia Gover, Author of Dreaming on the Page: Tap into Your Midnight Mind to Supercharge Your Writing

Join us for a book launch and author talk about how anyone can benefit from the Dreaming on the Page method whether you remember your dreams or not, and whether or not you consider yourself a writer. Bring a pen and prepare to be inspired!

“In Dreaming on the Page Tzivia Gover provides a powerful set of tools to unleash your creativity, enhance your writing, and inspire your life.” Naomi Epel, author of Writers Dreaming

“With a warm, sure hand, Tzivia Gover guides readers through her ‘Dreaming on the Page’ process, serving up engaging historical and personal anecdotes alongside concrete advice and helpful writing prompts and exercises. Accessible and unfailingly encouraging, Dreaming on the Page proves that dreaming and writing are for everyone—and that when you combine the two, the result can be truly magical.”  Brooke Warner, Publisher of She Writes Press and author of Write On, Sisters!

Tzivia Gover is a certified dreamwork professional and the author of several books, including Dreaming on the Page, How to Sleep Tight Through the Night (with Lesléa Newman), and The Mindful Way to a Good Night’s Sleep, among others. Tzivia writes and dreams in western Massachusetts. Learn more at www.thirdhousemoon.com

Reading Deprivation

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For writers, reading is a way of life. We read early and often. We read, we write. We check our media contacts, read newspapers or magazines online or in hard copy, then read a text of something similar to what we are working on in our own writing. If we stop reading, it’s deprivation.

It’s a paradox that by emptying our lives of all that text and distraction, we are actually refreshing the wellspring. By absenting ourselves from all the media, we get in touch with our inner selves, which is where all the creativity comes from. By keeping the inflow to a minimum, the outflow improves. Our true thoughts and feelings will begin to penetrate and come out in new writing, running freely. I knew a playwright who would take off his shoes and socks and stand in a running stream with a paper and pencil to literally get his flow going.

If you find not reading difficult, and many writers do, here are some suggestions:

.listen to music that has no words

.sew

.repot plants

.cook a complicated, time-consuming recipe and then

.invite friends to dinner

.watercolor

.rearrange the kitchen

.exercise

.meditate

.dance

After a number of these activities, sit down and write again. Notice any differences in your feelings or content. Your writing may benefit.

Follow me here on Thursdays.

Writers Read on October 23 in Ware, Massachusetts

There is going to be an in-person reading of prose and poetry at Grand Hall, Workshop 13 Cultural Arts and Learning Center in Ware, Massachusetts on Sunday, October 23 at 2 pm. If you’re in the area, do drop in. It’s right down Route 9, which is glorious fall now. Grand Hall is at 13 Church St. , Ware.

See Workshop13.org for more details.

In-Person Reading on 2 p.m. October 23rd at the Grand Hall, Workshop 13, Ware, Massachusetts

It has been awhile since I did an in-person reading, but if you are in Western Massachusetts on Sunday, October 23rd, I encourage you to come. The attached flyer has the details.

Radio Interview About the Writers Read Reading for Workshop 13

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I’m happy to have a radio interview to talk about the Writers Read Reading at 2 pm on Sunday, October 23rd at Workshop 13, 13 Church St., Ware, Massachusetts.

Stephanie Shafran and I will be interviewed and reading poetry for Tommy Twilight’s Twilight Poetry Pub on WXOJ-FM, Valley Free Radio on Tuesday, October 11 at 8 pm (EDT.)

Listen in.

Literature As Salvation

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Why does literature endure? Why do we read it? What makes the words so compelling, we can’t put the book down?

Literature, and the reading of it, has saved many people in difficult situations. Literature can show people at their best. If you’re living through a difficult situation, say prison, this can be an important hope and message. Words can teach, illuminate and inspire us. Nelson Mandella cites the books he read in jail that gave him solace during his long incarceration. He devoured anything he could read on armed combat because he was trying to form a Liberation Army. As a young strategist, he read about boxing when he tried to defeat his opponents in the ring or books on chess when he was competing in chess tournaments. “I had no time to brood. I enjoyed reading and writing letters and that occupied my mind completely…” says Mandela.

Most prisons have a library and prisoners are encouraged to read books. According to most state statutes, prisoners are entitled to legal texts to research their own appeals. In addition to lawl books, almost all libraries have literature. Sometimes there are limits on content, like rape or gun construction, but overall there is much literature available to inmates. Some of the most popular in prisons are Stephen King and Harry Potter novels. Orange is the New Black and Gone Girl are some of the most popular novels in prisons. Longer novels are also popular, like Ayn Rands The Fountainhead. Biographies of different famous Americans are also sought-after in prison.

We should donate books, and keep books circulating, to The Prison Project. In this way, prisoners will continue to read. It can only help us as writers. I will continue to blog on Thursdays. http://www.eileenpkennedy.com.

Blogging v. Writing

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How does blogging differ from writing? I guess when I sit down to write a poem or prose piece, I have a more formal block in my head. I think the main thing is that blogging is more spontaneous. You could argue that blogging has changed formal writing. But if you can write, you can blog.

The conventions of writing and blogging are very different. Run-0n sentences and asides don’t work in a blog. Short declarative sentences do.

Print stories are often written in the third person, especially nonfiction. Blogs are mostly in the I, first person.

In books, footnotes are frequently used to tell the backstory on your topic. They take up space. Hyperlinks serve a similar purpose in blogging. No one has to read them unless they click on them and they take very little space.

I enjoy blogging as a variation to my poetry. I will blog on Thursdays about the writing process. Follow me here at WordPress.

Using the Library for Writing

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I was struggling with writing a poem about a historical incident. I just couldn’t find a way into the poem. I tried locking myself in my study, ignoring the phone when it rang, procrastinating with housework, but nothing worked.

Then a writer friend of mine made a suggestion. Go to the Library. I live in Massachusetts where every town has a town library, but it just didn’t occur to me. I’ve read many articles and blogs on how to focus as a writer, but I hadn’t tried my local library.

I organized my writing materials as best I could, convinced I would leave important things at home that I would need there. I allowed for time to get to and from the library (about eight minutes each way. ) I carried my computer and notes to the car and set off.

When I arrived there, I found a lovely place to sit, a desk with partitions that actually blocked me from other desks. It was quiet and I easily tuned my computer into the wifi, and soon enough I was writing a rough draft. I came to a point where I needed to confirm some historical information, and the reference librarian was at the ready to help.

I wound up bringing the draft home and finishing it there. I recently submitted the poem. I don’t know if it will be accepted, but at least I finished it and it’s off my desk.

I’ll be blogging on Thursdays and doing announcements on Tuesdays as they come along. Follow me.

Listening to Your Inner Voice

Writers write in isolation mostly. Sometimes it’s in small groups or workshops, but mostly alone. Sometimes I wait until the last minute to write what I want? Why?

In the end, I try to listen to my inner voice that speaks my true thoughts that ultimately helps me cut through the nonsense that sometimes enters into my writing. Good writing comes from the true self.

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I use different methods to get in touch with my inner self. I meditate, move to a coffee shop or library, read a book of an author who is writing something similar to my project. Sometimes just sit quietly.

Join me in imagining and getting in touch with your inner self. Try writing from that one true voice.

I’ll continue to blog on Thursdays. If you’d like me to make an announcement for an upcoming reading, publication or award, get in touch with me here.