Using Your Inner Voice to Write

Writers write in isolation mostly. Sometimes it’s in small groups or workshops, but mostly alone. Sometimes I wait until the last minute to write what I want? Why?

In the end, I try to listen to my inner voice that speaks my true thoughts that ultimately helps me cut through the nonsense that sometimes enters into my writing. Good writing comes from the true self.

I am currently in Costa Rica, where I usually spend my winters. This is a Costa Rican flower that grows around where I live. I do the big push for my writing during this time. I’m currently working on a series of Ekphrastic Poems based on the work of Irene Christensen, a Norwegian artist, on Women and Nature.

I also read writers who I feel write from their inner selves. I’m currently reading Joy Harry’s “Catching the Light” about her inner process for developing poetry.

I use different methods to get in touch with my inner self. I meditate, move to a coffee shop or library, read a book of an author who is writing something similar to my project. Sometimes just sit quietly.

Join me in imagining and getting in touch with your inner self. Try writing from that one true voice.

I’ll continue to blog on Thursdays. If you’d like me to make an announcement for an upcoming reading, publication or award, get in touch with me here.

Using Creativity to Navigate the World

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With all the problems in the world, many of us are involved, to survive, in self-preservation behaviors. Creative activity can be a part of self preservation.

Think of increased creative capacity as growth.We should take creative actions to improve our creative growth. If we write a poem in a new form we’ve never used before, that can read to creative growth, for instance.

People who are creative are happier, healthier, and less lonely. A published poem can lead to a reading, a painting to an exhibit, a song to a concert. All of these things put us, and our art, out into the world to see and be seen and to interact.

A creative ability is a skill to use our imagination to solve a problem. We may feel stuck with a problem, but if we read up on how other people have solved this, or ask a friend how they solved this, we are using creativity to problem-solve.

You don’t have to be an artist to exercise your creative ability. You can use this skill to fulfill dreams, problem solve, and improve communication skills.

I’ll be blogging on Thursdays. Follow me here on WordPress.

Writing In Uncertain Times

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We live in unprecedented times. Pandemics, wildfires, hurricanes, floods, winter storms, political unrest, economic uncertainty and war are just some of the things we deal with daily. So why write through it?

Writing is important. As writers, we bear witness to what is going on in the world and write it down. It helps to put things into perspective and forms the basis of history. When we put our thoughts down on the page, it helps to give voice for those who may not be able to put it into words. It’s a comfort when we can form our feelings into writing that other people may read.

And when we write fantasy or fiction, we are allowing ourselves and others to get lost in escape. This is important in life also, especially when people are going through such massive upheavals. You can offer people relief though your literature.

Writers are sensitive to the world around them. This takes sympathy and empathy. Writers are empathetic to the suffering of others and can sometimes put this empathy into words and thus relieve the suffering. As writers, we have the gift of being able to put our feelings into words. Nelson Mandela said, “It always seems impossible until it’s done.” 

I’ll be blogging on Thursdays. Follow me here on WordPress.

I am grateful to Poetry Super Highway for Making Me Poet of the Week on Poetry Super Highway December 26-January 1, 2023. Take a look during that week:

I am grateful to have been chosen “Poet of the Week” on the Poetry Super Highway. Check it out on December 26-January 1, 2023 for my poem “A Paddle Into Childhood.”

Happy New Year to All. I’ll see you again in 2023.

Insecurity in Writing

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I’ve often heard the expression, “I’m not ready to write.” We all feel insecure when we’re not sure what “it” is.

Sometimes the material we’ve written comes from the imagination, memory, dreams, and who knows where. Sometimes it’s elusive and genre-bending. What on earth should we do with it in the bright light of day to “make it better”? To ensure it’s a “real piece”?

To nurture our creativity, we all need supportive spaces. We need to do our best, but not pressure for more and more. We should renew our inner resources to overcome obstacles and difficulties.

Especially in these difficult times with wars and pandemic, we need to remind ourselves of the beauty that exists. We need the support of our fellow artists.

I remember seeing on television a cello player performing amidst the rubble of bombed out buildings after an attack by the Russian army on his Ukrainian village. When interviewed, he said, “We’ll rebuild.” His message was one of hope through creativity. It’s an antidote for despair. What do you do to nature your creativity?

I’ll be blogging on Thursdays. Follow me on WordPress at https://www.eileenpkennedy.com.

HAPPY THANKSGIVING

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Happy Thanksgiving to all of you. Even if it’s not your tradition, it’s a day to be grateful and count your blessings.

I’m having guests, house guests and cooking a turkey dinner. I’m thankful for all of it.

I will blog again next Thursday, so follow me here.

Have a blessed, joyful day.

Incentives for Writing

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Whether you’re been writing for a long or short period of time, we sometimes need motivation to write. I’ve been writing since I was eight years old, but I sometimes get discouraged and lose motivation too.

Blogging is something that motivates my writing. It’s instant gratification. You write and publish instantly, and often get feedback very quickly. And if you have a fair amount of followers, all the better. You don’t have to wait months to hear from a publisher, magazine or journal. It’s out there for everyone to read.

A routine can be an incentive also. I usually write, depending on my appointments that day, right after breakfast. I associate that cereal, fruit and tea with writing and sometimes even start the process while I’m eating. I start thinking about what I’ll be writing after I finish. Writing after breakfast will also give you energy and prevent you from getting sluggish.

Another way to motivate is through social media. I know most of us think of social media as a time waster, but try using it. When you run out of steam with your writing, take a social media break. Look at Facebook or Instagram. I know many people think of it as a time waster, but look at the ideas of other people. You can even use some of the dialog in your writing. If you are on with other writers, you may get incentive from them and their process.

Try reading. I spend a good deal of my non-writing time reading. I’m a poet, so I often read new poets or my favorites. If I’m stuck on a problem, like how to write a particular form, like a Quatern, I’ll read other poets in this form and see how they have handled this. I’ll read novels just for the use of language in certain ways. It’s also just a pleasure for me to read good literature. Sometimes I read my friends most recent books and review them on social media.

I will be blogging on Thursdays about the writing process. Follow me here on WordPress.

Reading Deprivation

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For writers, reading is a way of life. We read early and often. We read, we write. We check our media contacts, read newspapers or magazines online or in hard copy, then read a text of something similar to what we are working on in our own writing. If we stop reading, it’s deprivation.

It’s a paradox that by emptying our lives of all that text and distraction, we are actually refreshing the wellspring. By absenting ourselves from all the media, we get in touch with our inner selves, which is where all the creativity comes from. By keeping the inflow to a minimum, the outflow improves. Our true thoughts and feelings will begin to penetrate and come out in new writing, running freely. I knew a playwright who would take off his shoes and socks and stand in a running stream with a paper and pencil to literally get his flow going.

If you find not reading difficult, and many writers do, here are some suggestions:

.listen to music that has no words

.sew

.repot plants

.cook a complicated, time-consuming recipe and then

.invite friends to dinner

.watercolor

.rearrange the kitchen

.exercise

.meditate

.dance

After a number of these activities, sit down and write again. Notice any differences in your feelings or content. Your writing may benefit.

Follow me here on Thursdays.

Writers Read on October 23 in Ware, Massachusetts

There is going to be an in-person reading of prose and poetry at Grand Hall, Workshop 13 Cultural Arts and Learning Center in Ware, Massachusetts on Sunday, October 23 at 2 pm. If you’re in the area, do drop in. It’s right down Route 9, which is glorious fall now. Grand Hall is at 13 Church St. , Ware.

See Workshop13.org for more details.

In-Person Reading on 2 p.m. October 23rd at the Grand Hall, Workshop 13, Ware, Massachusetts

It has been awhile since I did an in-person reading, but if you are in Western Massachusetts on Sunday, October 23rd, I encourage you to come. The attached flyer has the details.